Thursday, April 21, 2016

A Call to All Teachers

Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, We Teach the World.


Thursday, March 10, 2016

How Habitually Disruptive and Troubled Students Benefit from a Child Guidance or Therapeutic Approach

These are dramatic times for teachers. In educating children, we have a difficult and demanding role. Like no other, our profession is responsible in ensuring that children develop emotionally, socially, and academically. As society evolves in complexity, so does our role. With so many social and emotional issues affecting directly a student’s potential for learning, we can no longer guarantee our success in educating children relying only on academic expertise. The fact is that, like adults, in coping with modern society’s pressures and demands, children are paying a heavy emotional toll too. At alarming rates, more and more children and adolescents are experiencing all kinds of stress and trauma reactions, and at all levels of severity. This can turn into a chaotic scenario for teachers if it catches us ill-prepared.

Since children’s affective and emotional status strongly influences how they perform in the classroom, it is imperative for teachers to become acquainted with how students develop and function socio-emotionally. If we are going to remain effective in doing our job —thriving rather than simply surviving— we need direct access to the current ideas and latest development in child guidance or psychoeducation, a therapeutic approach that blends psychological and educational theories and research.

How Habitually Disruptive and Acting-Out Students Benefit from a Therapeutic Approach
Child guidance, a multidimensional approach to the education of children with emotional and behavioral difficulties, trains children in understanding how feelings and emotions relate to their behavior difficulties. To help students change dysfunctional behavior, this therapeutic model contains a mixture of affective (emotions), cognitive (thinking), and behavioral (behavior) elements, so that acting-out students learn to recognize and understand how their emotions and way of thinking drive their particular pattern of behavior. This therapeutic model is based on the principle that behavioral change comes when students are able to understand the motives behind their behavior and are properly trained in productive and more positive ways of behaving.

What Therapeutic Teachers Do for Habitually Disruptive and Acting-Out Students
Focusing on the unique social and affective needs of the child, a therapeutic teacher develops an adult-child relationship that is conducive to a new insight, and is growth promoting. The therapeutic teacher coaches the student in finding alternative ways of meeting his/her socio-emotional needs in a more effective and socially appropriate fashion. The teacher-student therapeutic relationship takes into full consideration the cognitive and affective factors that are influencing behavior, and involves the student in finding and implementing alternative ways of behaving. The student takes an active role throughout this process in his/her own emotional and behavioral improvement.
A therapeutic model is deeply rooted in the belief that all troubled behavior is determined by a multiplicity of factors in interaction, and that, to be able to change problem behavior, every aspect of the child’s personality —feeling, thinking, and behaving— needs to be taken into account. The therapeutic teacher explains important social and affective concepts and techniques to children, and trains disruptive and troubled students in how to manage their own emotions and behavior. The therapeutic teacher develops an accepting and trusting relationship with the difficult student, seeing the child’s disruptive and acting-out behaviors as a challenge for both teacher and student to master, and a rich opportunity to help the student develop more productive ways of feeling, thinking and behaving. The therapeutic teacher never “gives up” on the difficult student, perseverating in strengthening a mutually trusting relationship while implementing enhanced child guidance techniques to help the child. The therapeutic teacher always uses a solution-oriented language, focusing on the possible and changeable when working with the student, and expressing to the child that change is possible and that all students can develop self-control.

Now You Can Develop Child Guidance Skills
To learn how to cope with stressful or troublesome events, build positive attitudes and effective life skills, and achieve their social and academic goals, schools provide the ideal environment in which classroom teachers and related services personnel with the adequate training can teach social and affective skills to children. Teaching these important skills to students relates directly to the role of schools in preparing children to function effectively and to deal competently with society’s demands. When we teach social and affective skills to students, we are giving them the ability to understand and manage their own emotions and behavior, and we are assisting children in developing resilience in coping with further troublesome events along the road.

Unfortunately, a great deal of this very much-needed information from the child guidance and emotional communication literature never reaches teachers. In Psychoeducation for Teachers of Students with Behavior Problems, we recognize and address this need. Now we can train teachers to resolve students’ behavior problems by applying therapeutic techniques based on sound psycho-educational and communication principles. Grounded in the author’s strong psychological and educational background and expertise, Psychoeducation for Teachers of Students with Behavior Problems takes full advantage of current psychological and educational theory and research to train teachers in the child guidance techniques they need to become skillful behavior managers and behavior change promoters.

 Related Reading…

Essentials of Emotional Communication for Reaching the Unreachable Student: Where Do I Start? What Do I Say? How Do I Do It? To preview this book on Amazon, click on this link


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Monday, February 29, 2016

Tips for Handling Difficult and Disruptive Students/SEI

I'm reading, Tips for Handling Difficult and Disruptive Students, a 6-page PDF document by Special Education Institute (SEI). There is plenty of advice here, including: why students misbehave, different techniques for younger and older students, keeping control of the classroom and more. You will also find links for other articles, white papers and webinars. Interesting and informative. Check it out here.

Monday, February 1, 2016

Amazing Book Sale! For Teachers and School Staff

Watch Your Language! Ways of Talking and Interacting with Students that Crack the Behavior Code (eBook Format) is now on Kindle Countdown Deal. Hurry! Regular price returns February 4th, 2016.

To buy on Amazon, click here.

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Free eBook Promotion: All Behavior is Communication

All Behavior is Communication Revised Second Edition: How To Give Feedback, Criticism, and Corrections That Improve Behavior (Kindle Edition) is now FREE on my Amazon Store. Hurry! This is a three days only offer (January 14, 2016 - January 16, 2016). Get your free copy here.

Friday, January 8, 2016

Project IDEAL: Informing And Designing Education For All Learners

Looking for information to share with my readers, I came across this extraordinary website. Project IDEAL is part of a teacher preparation program intended to equip teachers to work with students with disabilities. They have three main sections (called Modules): (1) Disability Categories (background information), (2) IDEAL in Action (ideas to apply to real classroom situations) and a (3) Video Library. I found this website extremely informative, and highly recommend it. You can find Project IDEAL here.

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Watch Your Language! Ways of Talking and Interacting with Students that Crack the Behavior Code- For Teachers

Watch Your Language! Ways of Talking and Interacting with Students that Crack the Behavior Code by Carmen Y. Reyes, The Psycho-Educational Teacher, is a comprehensive resource (360+ pages) of skilled language-based interventions aimed at improving classroom behavior by improving the way teachers and students relate, placing special emphasis on those strained interactions with students exhibiting habitually disruptive patterns of behavior. Founded on theory and principles in interpersonal communication this interactional approach is rooted in the belief that teachers’ ways of talking play a crucial role in influencing how students behave. In other words, students’ behaviors are a reflection of both the words that teachers use and how we say those words to children. A core belief in interpersonal communication is that high expectations that are goal-oriented influence positive behaviors while low expectations lacking a behavior or academic goal influence negative behaviors. This innovative resource is a 10-chapter book divided into three core parts:
  • Part One: The Basics (Chapters 1-3) On this introductory section the essential elements of interpersonal communication are explained, including channels and styles. Chapter Two details four interpersonal communication theories with high relevance to the classroom setting; Chapter Three introduces the two main components: receptive side or listening and expressive side or speaking, including full lists of both listening and speaking skills.
  • Part Two: Interpersonal Communication is Everything… And Everywhere! (Chapters 4-7) This second part analyzes popular behavior-change procedures from the unique perspective of therapeutic communication (Chapter Four). Among these enhanced approaches we find: assertiveness, optimism, rational thinking and talking, goal-oriented language, social problem solving, and solution-oriented messages. Chapter Five gives us guidelines for becoming an effective communicator focusing on language skills such as rapport and empathy. The section ends with an analysis of nonverbal communication in the classroom including ways in which teachers can align verbal and nonverbal language to send supportive and encouraging messages to students.
  • Part Three: Speech Acts (Chapters 8-10) On this closing part, teachers learn how to manipulate different parts of a sentence (e.g. nouns, verbs, adjectives) to modify the meaning of our messages (Chapter Eight). Chapters Nine and Ten are all about disciplinary speech acts and how our messages to students can evolve from flat and short-term (short-lived) to transformative and long-term (i.e. discipline that the child internalizes or self-discipline). Using unparalleled disciplinary language such as suggestions and hidden commands coupled with child guidance speech acts such as: interpreting, reflecting, reframing, decoding, challenging, and confronting teachers will be able to turn-around day-to-day interactions with tough to reach and noncompliant students from antagonistic to collaborative problem-solving. Our language makes the difference!


Watch your Language! Ways of Talking and Interacting with Students that Crack the Behavior Code- To preview this book on Amazon.com, click here.



A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Friday, December 11, 2015

Memory Strategies for Low-Achieving Students

These guidelines are from my 7-page article, Memory Strategies to Help Students Remember what they See and Hear in the Classroom. To read the complete article, click on the link at the bottom.

  1. Short memorizing rehearsals are more productive than longer ones. Make sure that each practice is no longer than 30 minutes at a time.
  2. It is better to have five weekly rehearsals of 30 minutes each than one longer weekly practice (e.g. three or more hours in a row).
  3. Memory improves when students use multiple sensory pathways to learn the material. For example, when students are learning visual material, they need to elaborate verbally on what they are seeing. On the other hand, if students are trying to consolidate verbal material, for example, from the history textbook, memorization is easier if they draw a diagram or write smaller bits of information on index cards that they can study visually.
  4. When the learning material is both meaningful and organized is always easier to remember. When studying, children need to use organization aids such as timelines, outlines, bullet lists, flowcharts, cause and effect diagrams, and/or comparing and contrasting diagrams.
  5. Practice children in highlighting, outlining, and summarizing important information.
  6. Students can remember definitions better if they use their own words and/or paraphrase, rather than trying to memorize exactly what the teacher said or what they read in the book.
  7. Memorization improves when students think of something that connects with the new information, and link the new concept, topic or theme to what they already know.
  8. Teach students to think of examples of what they are trying to remember. The more connections they make, the more details they add to the concept or topic, and the more examples they can think of, the better their chances of memorizing and learning the information.
  9. Teach students to group the information, placing similar items together. For example, from a grocery list with 23 items, the child creates the fruits group, the vegetables group, and the meats group. Students need to know how many items they need to remember (23) and how many groups of items are in the list (3). It is harder to remember 23 isolated items from the longer list, but the same items are easier to recall if we group them in three groups, e.g. eight meats, six vegetables, and nine fruits.
You can read the full article here.


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

What is Learned Helplessness?

Learned helplessness is the belief that our own behavior does not control outcomes or results. For example, a child that believes she is in charge of the outcome thinks, “If I study hard for this test, I’ll get a good grade,” but a learned helpless child thinks, “No matter how hard I study for this test, I’ll always get a bad grade.” In school, learned helplessness relates to poor grades and underachievement, and to behavior difficulties. Students who are repeatedly exposed to school failure; for example, children with a learning disability, are particularly prone to develop learned helplessness. As a result of repeated academic failure, learned helpless children doubt their own abilities and doubt that they can do anything to overcome their school difficulties. As a consequence, they decrease their effort, particularly when facing difficult tasks, which leads to more school failure and learned helplessness.

On my 6-page article, When Children Fail in School: What Teachers and Parents Need to Know about Learned Helplessness, I discuss in-depth this very important topic, including a comprehensive list of characteristics of learned helpless children. The optimistic and pessimistic explanatory styles, as introduced by Seligman et al., are discussed. The article also explores the importance of strategy retraining, attribution retraining, and the belief that strategic effort increases ability and skills; all instrumental in helping children overcome learned helplessness. To read this article in full, click here.


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”